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The UWAtmosOutreach Video Group just finished a new video that uses a double pendulum to explain the difficulties of making long-range weather forecasts. You can watch the video here. Please feel free to share on twitter/social media, in the classroom, with the person sitting next to you on the bus, etc. 

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Congratulations to graduate student Michael Diamond and alumna Judy Twedt, who have both been selected as one of the Husky 100 this year! Each year, the Husky 100 recognizes 100 UW undergraduate and graduate students from Bothell, Seattle and Tacoma in all areas of study who are making the most of their time at the UW. 

Read more at UW

rofessors Lynn McMurdie & Bob Houze and graduate student Joe Zagrodnik are in the news<80><94>UW research finds rainfall over Olympic Mountains more complex than originally believed (By Scott Sistek,KOMO News) 

Read more at KOMO News

Graduate student Michael Diamond writes about the ORACLES field research campaign:

In August, dozens of scientists from across the United States descended on the small island nation of São Tomé and Príncipe. Nestled on the equator off the coast of western central Africa, São Tomé was an ideal location to study the phenomenon we had all gathered to observe: a seasonal plume of smoke from agricultural and forest fires that gets lofted by the prevailing winds from the African continent to over the southeast Atlantic Ocean. As part of the NASA field campaign Observations of Aerosols above Clouds and their Interactions, or ORACLES, our aim was to better understand how all that smoke over the ocean affects the amount of sunlight that gets absorbed in the atmosphere and at Earth’s surface.

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Postdoctoral Visiting Scientist Malte Stuecker, and Professors Cecilia Bitz and Kyle Armour are in the news:

While winter sea ice in the Arctic is declining so dramatically that ships can now navigate those waters without any icebreaker escort, the scene in the Southern Hemisphere is very different. Sea ice area around Antarctica has actually increased slightly in winter — that is, until last year.

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